How a Chiller, Cooling Tower and Air Handling Unit work together

How a Chiller, Cooling Tower and Air Handling Unit work together

Hi there Paul here from the engineering mindset calm in this video we’re going to look at the basic operation of a centralized chilled water system and this is very typical in in office buildings all around the world and we’ve got a little model here of a basic built office building stripped of all its insides and if you can imagine normally these floors will be filled with people and computers the server rooms and it’s going to generate a lot of heat especially when the Sun is beating down on the building in the middle of summer so this building is going to have to produce a lot of cooling to handle that heat and keep the inside of the building in a very nice temperature so how does it do that well you need some plant items first and in this very typical setup we’ve got a chiller here along with the distribution pumps the air handling units and the cooling tower which is up on the roof so the chiller is the the producer of chilled water in this system and the chiller has two main cylinders one is the evaporator here and that’s where the chilled or cold water is produced and the other cylinder is this at the back here which is the condenser which is the condenser silver and that is where the heat of the building is sent oh it’s collected and sent to the the cooling towers now a real cello will look something like this we have the evaporator the chilled side which is in this case all insulated to keep that cool cool thin side and then you’ve got the compressor on top as well as the power supply and the control to the system as well this is a centrifugal chiller there’s lots of different types which we will go into detail in this video I just need to understand the basics of how this building is called so the chilled water leaves the evaporator and it’s pulled out in this instance by the by the pump sometimes it can be pushed in in this case it’s being pulled out it’s depending on the system and the design of the chiller and you’ll notice that I’ve covered these pipes in one of the dark blue that’s for leaving the evaporator and I put a dark blue so that you know that it is a much cooler temperature so this is leaving at about 8 degrees something may or may be 6 to 8 degrees and is leaving in this design at 54 liters per second the other pipe the lighter blue one that is so you know it is a higher temperature and in this instance it’s about 14 degrees Celsius we have 12 to 14 maybe you look very higher maybe lower it all depends on the design of the system and the load of the building in the in the real world though these these pipes will not be this color then they could be but they’ll unlikely to be in the real world they will look something like this and you’ll you can see here we’ve got chill CHW chilled water flow and an arrow so you obviously understand where it’s going and chilled water returned we’ve set the pretty standard color bands and arrows and labeling system there and this is in almost every plant room you’ll find the pipe to be labeled and note noted this way but for illustration purposes I’ve just covered them in here so you get a better understanding of what is happening in the system so the pump is pulling this chilled water about eight degrees and it is sending it up into the riser a real-live pump looks something like this this is the direct coupled centrifugal pump with the motor on the back here and then it’s coupled straight on to the pump here which is under some installations you can’t see it unfortunately in this photo but that chilled water is sent up into the riser which this pipes here and they that riser those risers rise the height of the building and branching off of the risers are some feeds flow return into these which are air handling units in the real world the air handling units will probably look something like this this is a very small example there are much larger designs and even smaller units than this as well but it all depends on the design and the load of the building here we’ve got the flow returned and it’s going into the coil here which I’m going to explain about just shortly and we’ve got one coil here for heating and one for cooling as well which I’ll talk about next so the air handling unit its purpose is to take the warm air within the office floor we it gets pulled in through a fan and that fan then rejects it out the other side and it’s distributed off through some ductwork often various points in the office to where it’s needed and inside this air hanging unit is a coil and the coil looks something like this in the real world and chilled water enters the coil and makes its way up for always little little loops here and then back out the top here so that enters at about eight degrees in this example and by the time it reaches the top there it’ll leave that cooling coil at about fourteen degrees so that rising temperature is the result of the air which is passing through this air handling unit cooling down so the warm air enters it hits this coil the coil transfers it’s cool into the air and the air transfers its heat into the coil the air leaves at a lower temperature and the water then leaves at a higher temperature the air handling units they could be one per four there could be multiple per for all it could be one on the flow here and the ductwork serves the number of floors below and this is just illustration purposes to just help you understand that so that a chilled returned water goes back into a riser and that is fed back down into the evaporator of the chiller inside the chiller is a separate system which is running around between the compressor the condenser in the evaporator as well as the the vane guide at the bottom there and that is a refrigeration cycle happening in there and what’s happening there is the heat within this pipe here though is being carried away by the refrigerant and sent into the condenser where it can dump its heat and be taken away to the cooling towers inside the chiller it will look something like this so we’ve got the evaporator side here the cooler side and the condenser side here as well as the compressor and the vane guide at the bottom there so the refrigerant is just flow around this system here transferring that heat from one side to the other and going to another continuous loop we’ve got some other videos on the refrigeration cycle if you want to learn more just check out our videos so now that the heat in this pipe here has been transferred over to the condenser side the condenser then sends this water which is now it’s just now called the condenser water and sends that up to the tower and in this instance I’ve colored this pipe red so that you know it’s a higher temperature and in this example that’s good it’s about 35 degrees Celsius OC and it’s for the flow rate of about 58 litres a second as well being sent up to the cooling towers that can change us it’s just on this design for illustration purposes and we’ve got the condenser return water here and in this example it’s about 28 degrees so it’s lost in atomic is up to the cooling tower and comes back it’s lost about 7 degrees in this instance that’s at design though in rip in the real world it may not be as high as that in the winter it wouldn’t would be much lower to but yesterday in the real world the condenser the pipe work it looks own like this so oh sorry that’s the wrong one that’s children to return it will just say condenser water here and we’ll have some markings on colors there I’ve used the wrong image apologies so that warm condenser water is sent up to the cooling towers on the roof of the building and in this instance it’s and open cooling tower so that means that the warm condensed water enters into the cooling tower and is sprayed and that spray is then runs down the inside of the cooling towers collect at the bottom running in the opposite direction is some is air being pulled by these fans here and that these fans pull the ambient air outside the building into the cooling tower and out up through the top in that process this warm condenser water will lose some of its heat and the air entering and leaving this cooling tower will it will leave a much higher temperature than when it came in it also left with some moisture so the relative humidity will have increased as well a real cooling tower looks something like this this is the bounty more air coil company this is a very typical cooling tower you’ll find on the roof of lots of buildings and just to give you an idea I’m not familiar with cooling towers this is New York City and as you can see almost every building here has cooling towers of one size or another some more than others it all depends on the size of the building and what’s happening inside there as well but they are on every big building in pretty much every city around the world so once this cooling tower has lost about seven degrees in the cooling process is collected at the bottom and it is sent back down to the condenser pump and that is then pushed back inside the condenser I’ve actually put this pump run the wrong way there that’s obviously coming out there should be the other way we pipe the other way but this is the free video so I’m not great together and yeah so this is where the the water the condenser water then comes back into here enters into these coils inside and picks up more heat and is sent back up to the cooling towers it’s important to note that this system here the condenser water system and the chilled water system are completely separated they do not interact they do not swap the water in between it is just the refrigerant that what happens in the refrigeration cycle between these units that’s the only thing that passes between them the water in here is sealed in tubes and and leaves again those pipes also in this instance we’ve got one plant item and my plant item I mean that a mechanical asset in the real world it’s unlikely you’ll have just one you’ll probably have n plus 1 so n whatever you need you have that number plus 1 because if this item here was the break or say this pump here was the break then we wouldn’t be able to produce called walk cooled water or condenser water and we wouldn’t be able to cool the building down so we’d always usually have at least two units then ill operate in duty and standby so only one plant item will operate at any one time and they will probably rotate their duty so that this pump will run for a week and the other one but then learn for the week afterwards and swap vice versa and that also allows you to carry out maintenance on the system as well on large buildings you’re more likely to have a more much more complex system than this you’ll have two three four chillers maybe even more than that and a lot more air handling units and cooling towers or bigger cooling towers and the complexity of the system is completely based on the load of the building you might even have a number of separate chilled water systems you could have a system which deals with critical so it’s generator fed and it supplies only the server rooms because they need cooling 24/7 and you’ll have this common a centralized system which handles there’s the space temperature within the floors but this is a very basic overview and we’ll go into more complex systems in later videos but thank you for watching and please check out our others

T4E – Furnace/Winter Tune Up Part 2 (Testing)

T4E – Furnace/Winter Tune Up Part 2 (Testing)

So, we will attach the power. And we could run up to the thermostat and turn the thermostat on but, we like to do it down here where we can be in control. So, this is a jumper wire. And what I’m going to do is hook it up to terminal R, which is my power. And I’m going to hook it up to terminal W. There’s W. So, we’ll put it on W. Okay. Let’s turn the gas on. Normally in a home, that would be on. The door switch is the next safety to protect you from working in here. So, we’re going to push the door switch in. These two lights should come on. There they go. The inducer motor just came on. And that is creating a positive draft up the flue. It’s going to prove to this switch that it’s running.

That signal comes down to the board; will come out of the board and go up here and turn on our hot surface igniter. And all of this is timed by the board. So, it’s what we call a sequence of operation. Now, there’s my pilot or igniter. It’s on. The next thing the board will do is open the gas valve. The flame– the gasoline in lit. We have a flame. Now the board has a timer and in thirty seconds or so, it will turn the blower motor on and blow that heat up and into the house. If I stand up here I’ll be able to feel the blower when it turns on. There it goes. It came on. The blower’s now running, pushing air up, which is pushing that hot air up into your house to heat your house. When the thermostat reaches a temperature it will shut off the furnace; which will shut off the flame. The blower motor will continue to blow till it blows all that heat up into the house and then the blower motor will cycle off.

This is what a service tech does to ensure that your furnace is working properly for the winter. One other thing he or she might do would be do a test for carbon monoxide gases. And again that would be in a video later we’ll do. This process that the furnace is going through now is what we call the sequence of operation. And a service tech always wants to make sure that that operation– that sequence is performing as it should, and that everything is safe electrically and with gas. I did this complete winter tune-up with two nut drivers and a flashlight.

It’s very easy to do. This is a very smart thing that everybody should have done to their furnace in the winter time because if anything goes wrong– the blower just shut off. If anything goes wrong there could be a potential for a fire. And we don’t want to take that chance with anybody getting hurt. There’s also a potential for carbon monoxide poisoning.

And again, we will test at another video; and all these things a service tech will test to make sure your furnace is safe for this winter. Now that it’s done that, we take the door. We put it back on. When we put the door on, it will depress that switch I was holding. And so, putting the door on is important. You want make sure you put it in at the bottom. Slide it up. Raise it up. Push in, and down. And that will secure that it’s on. And I can look in there and see that red and green light flashing so I know I’ve got power again. I take the top door. It goes in at the top. Go up. Push in at the bottom, and down. And that locks the doors on there. The furnace is all back together, and ready to go.

This is what service techs are doing this time of the year. And they call it a winter tune up. .

IKEA Home Solar is easy to install

IKEA Home Solar is easy to install

Half of my roof is covered in solar panels that are facing south. We had a perfect roof, facing south, nothing special, everything went as it should. Yeah, it was a lot of fun seeing it all come together so quickly, really. I thought it was going to take weeks to have it installed. They arrived at 8 am and at 12 am they were finished. We didn’t have to do much, we just had to offer them tea, And that was it. .

How to repair your Baxi E119 fault , Main and Potterton

How to repair your Baxi E119 fault , Main and Potterton

My name’s Allen Hart and today we’re at a brand-new box a platinum combi boiler installation that will installing and I’m just going to show you how to top the pressure up should you get the a119 fault so as we can see here the fault code on the front of the boiler is flashing a119 and a119 unboxer means a low water pressure so you just have a look at your gauge there and you would see bass below into the red which means that the pressure needs to be topped up so what we’ll do here we’ll show you how to deal with so what we need to do we need to have a look underneath the boiler so underneath the boiler here there’s some valves so then valves at the back without touch them which of these two front ones so these two blue ones are the front so that’s in the bucket Platinum also the same on the box if your tech as well so just as down inverter and both these valves off so these are now both in the off position and then what we need to do is we will slowly but first of all we’ll turn this one on and then we will slowly turn the other valve on here and then when we look on the pressure gauge on the front of the boiler we will see the pressure gauge starts to go up so what we want to do really want to top this up switch just above sort of like the one area so then we need to just slowly top it up a bit Marge to get it above one so I normally do it up to the top of that very merely in between like just over one and a half and then turn it back off on the bottom and then blow valves so we can see that now the fault code is no longer there and now the by the will work so we turn the violent back on it will work we’ve actually topped up to about till here so it’s gone a little bit higher and that’s because we’re still testing this system and but this is just demonstration video for you just to help you thank you for taking the time to watch our video how to repair or refill a buck see your tech and boxy platinum with an A one one nine fault code thank you

What’s Inside A Filter Drier – How it works hvac

What’s Inside A Filter Drier – How it works  hvac

Hey there guys Paul here from the engineering mindset .com in this video we’re going to be looking inside one of these the hermetic filter a dryer by Danfoss coming up what are they used for where do we find them and then we’ll cut one open and look at all the parts inside and discuss the purpose of each bit if by the end of this video you still haven’t had your fill of filter dryers then I suggest you head over to DanFoss learning and dive into their collection of free elessons danFoss is passionate about sharing knowledge so in addition to sponsoring this video they’ve also made hundreds of elessons available for free on their website including multiple courses on filters dryers you can find all of it by following the link in the video description down below where do we find these filter dryers this is a very typical model filter dryer and we’ll find these installed in the liquid line of the refrigeration system between the condenser and the expansion valve we’ve covered how expansion valves heat exchanges and refrigerants work in our previous videos do check those out links in the video description down below on the side of the filter dryer you’ll find an arrow this indicates the direction of refrigerant flow some models for heat pumps might be bi-directional and the arrow will point both left and right but in this case we have a single direction one-way filter dryer on the outside we have a powder painted surface which just prevents corrosion and the black gloss finish which just gives a premium look and feel the casing is made from steel to give it a strong structure as this will be under some high internal pressure out once connected into the refrigeration system at each end we have some solder connections which can either be pure copper or copper plated depending on the model so what do we use a filter dryer for well these are found in refrigeration systems and as you might guess from their name their job is to filter and dry the refrigerant they protect the refrigeration system and its components by capturing and absorbing water particles as well as harmful solid substances this will prevent them from cycling around the system and getting into the compressors that valves the sensors etc to keep the system running in optimal conditions anyway enough about that let’s cut it open and look inside of the components I’m just going to use a slit disk in the angle grinder to cut this one open I’m going to start with a fresh disc just to get the maximum cutting depth then I’ll lock the filter dryer into the bench vise to stop it moving around then we can just slice for it nice and easy with the grinder as I said the casing is made of steel so we’re going to get a lot of sparks flying around the workshop so we have to make sure we’re wearing some protective clothing and also move any flammable materials out of the way I’ve just reposition this in the vise to get my second cut not roughly ninety degrees to the first just let us look inside all right that’s the casing cut open let’s pull it apart to look inside so as we remove the casing we instantly see some of the key components inside the biggest component being the solid core but we’ll look at that in just a moment now at the refrigerant inlet end we have a large spring I’ve actually cut through this one so it has lost its shape and I can just pull the remaining parts of that out but the spring pushes against both the casing and the solid core this is just there to keep the core in a fixed position inside the casing next we have the core or the molecular sieve this particular model has a solid core 80% of which is a molecular sieve and 20% is an activated alumina I’ll show you some close-ups here of that porous material the solid core molecular structure acts as a filter to capture any large particles the material is similar to a sponge in that it can soak up and retain water the aluminium oxide is added in there to capture and retain the acids not all filter dryers will have activated alumina inside them it depends on the application so the refrigerant enters and surrounds the outside of the core the pressure of the system forces the refrigerant to pass through the porous material notice this groove inside the refrigerant will pass through the solid core and then collect in this groove to continue its flow towards the expansion valve at the end of the solid core we have a screen this polyester mat retains the smaller dirt particles which might have been able to pass through the solid core the material is able to capture dirt particles down to 25 microns with minimal pressure drop after the screen we have a perforated plate this is just there to keep all the internal parts in position the holes just allow the refrigerant to flow to the outlet the refrigerant then leaves the filter dryer and heads to the expansion valve so the refrigerant enters through the inlet it passes across the spring and then surrounds the outside of the solid core the spring is pushing and holding everything in place the refrigerant then passes through the solid core and as it does so the dirt moisture and acids are absorbed the refrigerant then collects in the groove at the center of the core and then it passes through the screen it then passes through the perforated plate and exits the unit having been filtered and dried the refrigerant then continues to the expansion valve ready to continue your education on filter dryers then head over to the Danfoss learning web page now and start your first course for free just follow the link in the video description below ok that’s it but if you want to continue your learning then just click on one of the videos on screen now and I’ll catch you there for the next lesson don’t forget to follow us on Facebook Twitter Instagram and of course the engineering mindset comm

How Forced Air Central Split Systems Work – Younits.com [HD]

How Forced Air Central Split Systems Work – Younits.com [HD]

Let’s talk today about what makes up a split central system for heating and air conditioning it’s described as a split system because it consists of indoor equipment and outdoor equipment which is connected by a pipe known as a line set the indoor equipment would consist of a gas-fired furnace or an air handler the outside equipment would be a condenser unit and also could be a heat pump the gas fired furnace is going to produce a flame which is going to heat up a wire grid that wire grid is known as a heat exchanger a blower is then going to blow that air through ductwork through the house it’s going to come out the outlets and be drawn across the room to a larger duct known as an air return this circulates the air across the room keeping the room comfortable and returns back to the furnace where the process is repeated now there are three different styles of burners there’s a single stage which simply goes on and off there’s a two stage which has a high and a low setting and there’s also a modulating which is going to be the most efficient type and that is going to increase or decrease depending upon demand similarly the blower motor itself is available as a multi speed low medium or high settings or variable speed which again will be the most efficient method of operation it should also be noted that the furnace or air handler are available in a variety of configurations up flow units would typically be mounted in the basement a down flow unit is often used in a first floor application and in the attic or crawl spaces oftentimes we would use horizontal units these are all available in packages that are very cost effective or individual components can be purchased separately to customize your installation to make it most effective and efficient during the cooling season the condensing unit outside is going to have refrigerant pipes which is going to transfer cold refrigerant back into the house and it’s going to go into an evaporator coil which is there going to be in case or on case on top of the furnace unit itself when it goes to the evaporator coil cold air will be transferred while removing humidity from the air this blower motor will again Tran it blow this cool air through the outlets and across the room and return back to the unit to complete the process a heat pump operates in the same manner for the cooling it does have a distinction in the wintertime it is able to produce heat ironically it takes cold outdoor air and compresses and condenses that outdoor air to generate heat and that heat is transferred into the furnace unit itself from where it is carried throughout the house there is another type of system known as a hybrid the hybrid system actually incorporates a heat pump and also a traditional or conventional gas fired furnace the advantage of this is that during more moderate times the heat pump can be used which is a more cost-effective way to deliver heating and cooling because it just runs on electricity alone during times when it exceeds 40 degrees and gets lower than that the furnace would automatically kick in you don’t have to manually adjust that and therefore the furnace could deliver a greater volume of heat in times when there’s greater demand check out all the components that are available from units comm y-o-u and i TS comm you

Simmons Plumbing and HVAC|Life Happens Here|Your 24/7 Plumber

Simmons Plumbing and HVAC|Life Happens Here|Your 24/7 Plumber

Intro music Dave (V.O.): My Oldest Friend Dave (V.O.): My First Love Dave (V.O.): My Far East Dave (V.O.): My West Side Dave (V.O.): My Private Side Dave (V.O.): My Heartbeat Dave (V.O): My Heartache Dave (V.O.): Life Happens Here Dave (V.O.): We are . . Simmons Plumbing .

Air Cond Services ☼ East Brunswick NJ ☼ Air Conditioner Contractor

Air Cond Services ☼ East Brunswick NJ ☼ Air Conditioner Contractor

Looking for an HVAC contractor in East Brunswick NJ? For service you’ll never regret, make sure the Air Cond company that YOU choose has three vital qualities… 2 of which most people never even think of. Keep watching and you’ll learn exactly what they are: The 1st thing that you want if you need air conditioner work is FAST, reliable service. One sure way to get this is to call a local company with technicains standing by Locally. Rafail’s Heating & Cooling is committed to East Brunswick and never more than minutes away! The 2nd thing that you must have in order to be happy with your Air Cond service is professional, quality work that is done right the first time. Licensed and certified HVAC contractor… Rafail’s Heating & Cooling takes the importance of doing AC work so seriously… that they made “Doing the job right the first time” part of their company slogan! The 3rd thing that makes for a great HVAC contractor experience is enjoying a special price on the work done for you. Mention this video and Rafail’s Heating and Cooling will give you 50% discount on your diagnstic charge (If you need AC repair) or up to $500 trade in on your old AC unit when you upgrade to a qualifying new high effiency York AC system from Rafail’s HVAC.

Don’t delay, this offer won’t last forever. Call Rafail’s now! .

HVAC Installations and Building Codes – Anchoring Appliances

HVAC Installations and Building Codes – Anchoring Appliances

Is the furnace a fixed appliance? Isn’t it designed not to be moved around from place to place? If you think it is, then the building code says we have to secure that appliance so that it can’t move around by nature or someone bumping into it. That’s coming up on Code Corner today. If this is your first time watching our channel, please click subscribe down here on the bottom right, and if you click that little bell right next to it, you’ll be notified of all our videos as soon as they come out. Don’t forget to get your official Fox Family merch available on Teespring.com down below this video. If you’ve ever wanted Fox Family swag, here’s your chance to grab the same stuff we wear on the job out in the field! Now I’m not here to pretend I know or could even interpret all the codes correctly.

In this series of videos, I’m simply trying to open a conversation about codes we cite on the job every day out there without even knowing it. But where is that code in the book? That’s what this project is all about. Ultimately, these videos are for my technicians at Fox Family but if they help you, then that’s great! And good for you for even caring about the building codes enough to watch this video. It means you care about your work too! So let’s take a look at what the codes say about existing buildings and adherence to the code when doing an HVAC change-out. Did you know we’re supposed to secure our HVAC equipment in manner so they can’t shift places or be moved around. The International Mechanical Code says in 301.18 Seismic Resistance, where earthquake loads are applicable, mechanical system supports shall be designed and installed for the seismic forces. The California Mechanical Code says in 303.4 Anchorage of Appliances, Appliance designed to be fixed in position shall be securely fastened in place in accordance with the manufacturer’s installation instructions.

Supports for appliance shall be designed and constructed to sustain vertical and horizontal loads within the stress limitations specified in the building code. The first part of this argument is whether the furnace or air conditioner is an appliance designed to be fixed in position. I say yes, it is designed to be fixed in position because of the high voltage, low voltage, gas piping, condensate drainage, refrigerant lines, and ductwork that all lead to this one specific location in the attic, and where else are we going to put it? Are we moving this thing in five years or something? Even then, I think it’s still designed to be fixed in position until relocation occurs. We recently moved a furnace on a remodel about four feet to the left into a new closet. The gas, high and low voltage, flue pipe, condensate, refrigerant lines, and ductwork all had to be modified to make the relocation happen. So, projects like this do occur, but in my mind the furnace and AC were still meant to be in one location for the life of the system. What do you guys think about this.

Is the furnace designed to be fixed in position to you? Let us know in the comments below! Okay this is for you guys who, like me upon hearing this code, scoffed at the idea of an earthquake hitting this area. I think, in my mind, I meant an earthquake couldn’t hit this area. It’s in this low-lying area in the center of the Sacramento Valley. And there are no faults around here anyways. They’re all in the bay area. I guess 1/5th of America experiences earthquakes throughout the year that average anywhere from a 4.2 to 6.7 in magnitude. This prompted the code to adapt this section regarding anchorage of appliances. The goal is to prevent the equipment from moving around in case it gets bumped into or seismic activity. So, what do we have to do in order to comply with this rule? The code inspectors, when we started getting called on that around here, told us to “secure the furnace to the platform for seismic reasons.” There are over 500 active faults in California. The chance that a magnitude 6.7 earthquake or greater will hit in the next 30 years, is greater than 99%.

They also say most Californians live within 30 miles of an active fault line. To the north of Sacramento, the Cleveland Hill fault around Lake Oroville last shifted 43 years ago. It’s 5.7 magnitude cracked walls and plaster in homes around the area. Even the State Capital downtown had minor damage to the dome. And Oroville is 60 miles away! To the west of us, the Hayward Fault in the Bay Area shook Berkley with a 4.4 magnitude earthquake just last year. And no one needs to be reminded of the San Andreas fault that runs through San Francisco. These two faults are the biggest threats right now to the Bay Area. The San Joaquin region to the south of us has its own active fault lines. And, finally, the Sierra Nevadas to the east of us were literally shaped by repeated earthquakes on fault lines all over that region. The Sierras have fault lines along the crest that run right through Lake Tahoe.

Like, in Sacramento, 65 miles away, we didn’t feel that 4.4 magnitude that hit Berkley last year. But experts say if a big 6 or 7 magnitude hit the east bay, we could very easily feel it. Or not! It depends on the type of earthquake it turns out to be. So, what exactly are we supposed to do to secure the furnace or the air conditioner so that it wont move during seismic activity? It’s pretty simple. We just need to make sure to use some sort of metal strapping secured to the unit and then to the base it’s sitting on, like the platform you’re servicing from. On the furnace, we can take some 1 ½” wide metal duct strap, or even plumbers’ tape and secure it to the furnace and to the floor it is sitting on. In a closet or garage we will take some strap and secure it to the furnace and to the walls next to it.

But make sure you hit a stud with that, because a screw through just sheetrock only, won’t cut it. Realistically, here in Sacramento, I think we should label ourselves as very unlikely to be affected by an earthquake. But we do service a wide region here at Fox Family, so the farther out from Sacramento we go, the greater the chance of those homeowners experiencing the affects of seismic activity. Therefore, we will continue to strap the units down to the decking in the attic and securing our AC to the pad it sits on to prevent shifting. Well, I hope this clarifies the part of the mechanical code that talks about why we need to strap our units to the ground.

It may not come across as clear as other parts of the code, but it’s legit, and if the inspector writes you up for it, now you know why. Well, If this is your first time watching our channel, please click subscribe down here on the bottom right, and if you click that little bell right next to it, you’ll be notified of all our videos as soon as they come out. Don’t forget to get your official Fox Family merch available on Teespring.com down below this video. If you’ve ever wanted Fox Family swag, here’s your chance to grab the same stuff we wear on the job out in the field! Thanks so much and we’ll see you on the next video! .

Dryer Not Drying? Cycling Thermostat Testing, Troubleshooting

Dryer Not Drying? Cycling Thermostat Testing, Troubleshooting

A cycling thermostat is a switch that is actuated by temperature change if your dryer does not heat at all you should test the thermostat for continuity at room temperature a continuity tests will determine if a continuous electrical path is present in the thermostat at room temperature the thermostat should have continuity no continuity means the electrical path is broken and the thermostat has failed you can choose from a variety of multimeters to perform the test for this demonstration we will use both analog and digital models when using an analog model first rotate the range selection dial to the lowest setting for ohms of resistance then calibrate the meter by pinching the probes together while adjusting the needle to read zero when using a digital model again rotate the dial to the lowest setting for ohms of resistance or resistance with tone if your meter has this option before you begin make sure the thermostat has been removed or isolated from the appliance some cycling thermostats have more than two terminals since the inner terminals are for a small heater only used to control the low heat setting test the park by touching the probes to the outer terminals only if the meter reading shows zero ohms of resistance the thermostat has continuity if the meters needle does not move or the digital display does not change significantly there is no continuity which means the thermostat has failed and will need to be replaced while the thermostat should display continuity at room temperature it should switch off or display no continuity when heated if the thermostat does not switch off when heated or switches off prematurely your dryer will be there overheat or heat improperly a cycling thermostat will switch off between one hundred twenty and one hundred sixty degrees fahrenheit depending on the thermostat refer to the designation printed on the part itself to test the thermostats response to temperature change placed the component on an electric griddle or skillet and set the heat to the appropriate temperature if the thermostat switches off within five percent of that temperature the part is functioning properly if the thermostat does not switch off or switches off prematurely the thermostat is faulty and will need to be replaced